Nearly 5,000 Cave Paintings Discovered In Mexico

June 5, 2013 / Mexico, North America
INAH specialists located the cave paintings in the Sierra de San Carlos, Tamaulipas.

INAH specialists located the cave paintings in the Sierra de San Carlos, Tamaulipas. Photo via INAH

Archaeologists have discovered nearly 5,000 paintings in the caves and ravines of the Sierra de San Carlos, municipality of Burgos, Tamaulipas.

Archaeologist Martha Garcia Sanchez announced the discovery and his resulting research during the Second Historical Archaeology Symposium, held at Mexico’s National Museum of History last month.

The artwork was found at eleven sites, some of which were more highly decorated than others. In one cave alone, more than 1,550 images have been recorded.

Burgos Municipality, Tamaulipas, Mexico

Made by at least three groups of hunter-gatherers in the region, the 4,926 paintings depicted hunting, fishing and gathering, as well as anthropomorphic, religious and astronomical images, temporary housing sites and representations of the regions flora and fauna region including deer, lizards and centipedes.

The finds are especially significant as it documents the presence of pre-Hispanic habitation in an area that was previously thought to have been uninhabited.

Unfortunately experts have not yet been able to date the paintings, due to a lack of objects to test. However there is hope that chemical analysis of the pigments will be able to determine the approximate age.

Identifican 5 mil pinturas rupestres en Tamaulipas [INAH]

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