Cavers Discover Paleolithic Cave Art in Northern Spain

March 18, 2015 / Spain, Europe
Cave art discovered recently in Cueva Aurea in the Cantabria region of northern Spain.

Cave art discovered recently in Cueva Aurea in the Cantabria region of northern Spain. Photo via Government of Cantabria

Cavers stumbled upon some Paleolithic cave art earlier this month during explorations in the Cantabria region of northern Spain.

The cavers, members of the Espeleoclub Sabadell, had been exploring Cueva Aurea, located in La Hermida Gorge about 50 meters (164 feet) above the river Deva, when they made the discovery on March 3rd.

Upon discovering the artwork, they quickly notified the proper agencies who soon visited the cave and verified the find; a first for the immediate area in a region that is known for its rock art.

Appearing to be painted with fingertips, the handful of red geometric compositions discovered feature circles and arcs similar to other sites in the region.

Although the artwork found close to the mouth of the cave have been described by museum staff who investigated the find as virtually lost, the lower areas of the cave are reportedly excellently preserved.

In order to keep the remaining art intact, the cave has been closed to the public.

The Cantabria region is home to some six dozen cave art sites, ten of which have been granted World Heritage status by UNESCO including the crown jewel Altamira.

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